Skip to content ↓

Teaching & Learning

PE

In addition to the many health benefits such as combatting childhood obesity, PE has the ability to build up a child’s self-esteem, confidence, motivation, teamwork, fair play, independence, leadership and their ability to play sport. As well as develop cross curricular skills such as literacy and numeracy and help children to learn to release stress in a constructive way.

Key Stage 3

Year 7

The course

All Year 7 experience a wide range of activities in their mixed gender and ability PE groups. These activities include: gymnastics, hockey, trampolining, fitness, basketball, badminton, rugby, netball, football, tennis, athletics and rounders. They study each sport for approximately 5 weeks and spend time looking at skills in isolation and in competitive situations. Students are able to get involved with leadership, officiating, coaching and playing roles, as well as learn about how to work within a team and as an individual. As they move up the key stage they are able to develop the breadth of their knowledge in terms of rules, skills and techniques.

What homework is set?

Homework is set on an informal basis in PE at Key Stage 3. Students may be asked to research rules of a sport, or facts, or remember field positions for a sport, or maybe to practice a skill they have been practising in the lesson in order to master it in the next lesson.

How are students assessed?

Students are assessed through the mastery program in PE, this is a series of “I can” statements specific to each sport being covered which students are traffic-lighted against to assess their progress. So for example if a student was covering rugby a series of I can statements could include I can understand both scoring and pitch positions, I can pass on both my weak and my strong side etc. These are then traffic lighted (green – mastered, amber – nearing mastery and red – not yet mastered).  Peer and self-assessment are also used to help with assessments during blocks of work, this helps them to become independent and reflective learners.

Year 8

The course

All Year 8 experience a wide range of activities in their mixed gender and ability PE groups. These activities include: gymnastics, hockey, trampolining, fitness, basketball, badminton, rugby, indoor games, handball, tennis, athletics and volleyball. They study each sport for approximately 5 weeks and spend time looking at skills in isolation and in competitive situations. Students are able to get involved with leadership, officiating, coaching and playing roles, as well as learn about how to work within a team and as an individual. As they move up the key stage they are able to develop the breadth of their knowledge in terms of rules, skills and techniques.

What homework is set?

Homework is set on an informal basis in PE at Key Stage 3. Students may be asked to research rules of a sport, or facts, or remember field positions for a sport, or maybe to practice a skill they have been practising in the lesson in order to master it in the next lesson.

How are students assessed?

Students are assessed formally at the end of each sports block, but are assessed throughout the block too through peer and self-assessment, these help with students becoming independent and reflective learners. Students will be assessed against a series of factors including their ability to perform set skills, their understanding of how skills are performed and which rules are appropriate at any given time.

Year 9

The course

All Year 9 experience a wide range of activities in their mixed gender PE groups. PE groups are setted to focus attention on the different needs of the learner at this stage, so groups are split into ability levels focussing on GCSE criteria for the higher ability learners and more fundamental skills in the lower ability groups. These activities include: gymnastics, hockey, trampolining, fitness, basketball, badminton, volleyball, indoor games, handball, tennis and athletics. They study each sport for approximately 5 weeks and spend time looking at skills in isolation and in competitive situations. Students are able to get involved with leadership, officiating, coaching and playing roles, as well as learn about how to work within a team and as an individual. As they move up the key stage they are able to develop the breadth of their knowledge in terms of rules, skills and techniques but do start to focus on tactical play in year 9 and a lot of the skills they focus on are worked on in competitive situations.

What homework is set?

Homework is set on an informal basis in PE at Key Stage 3. Students may be asked to research rules of a sport, or facts, or remember field positions for a sport, or maybe to practice a skill they have been practising in the lesson in order to master it in the next lesson. At Year 9 there is some homework set that can aid learning in Year 10 should they pick GCSE PE such as researching components of fitness and possible fitness tests.

How are students assessed?

Students are assessed formally at the end of each sports block, but are assessed throughout the block too through peer and self-assessment, these help with students becoming independent and reflective learners. Students will be assessed against a series of factors including their ability to perform set skills, their understanding of how skills are performed and which rules are appropriate at any given time.

Key Stage 4

We offer GCSE PE and Sport BTEC as an option for students in Key Stage 4, as part of the Route 1 Foundation Learning, and the Route 2 and Route 3 English Baccalaureate.

GCSE PE

The course

The PE course has two main elements: Practical and Theory.

Practical

The practical element is worth 40%. This includes an extensive range of activities to suit all individual needs. Practical performance in three different physical activities in the role of a player/performer (one in a team activity, one in an individual activity and a third in either a team or in an individual activity. They must then analyse and evaluate a performance to bring about improvement in one of their chosen activities.

Theory

The theoretical element is worth 60%.
• 2x written papers – each paper is 1hr 15minutes in duration.
• Multiple choice, short answer questions plus extended answer questions with scenarios.
Theory content includes:
• Anatomy and physiology including the skeleton, muscles, bones, joints, movements, structure and function of the cardio-respiratory systems, short term and long term effects of exercise to the body, movement analysis – levers, biomechanics.
• Physical training including components of fitness, fitness testing, methods of training, optimising training and minimising injuries.
• Socio-cultural influences and well-being in physical activity and sport including sports psychology, classification of skills, the use of goal setting, basic information processing, guidance and feedback on performance, mental preparation for performance, engagement patterns of social groups, commercialisation of sport and physical activity, ethical and socio-cultural issues, physical, emotional and social health, fitness and well-being, consequences of a sedentary lifestyle and energy use, hydration and nutrition.
The workload and degree of difficulty of the subject is equal to any other GCSE subject.

What can students go on to do after this course?

PE and Sports can be continued in the Sixth Form, either an A-Level in PE or BTEC Level 3 in Sport. The career opportunities are endless – sports development, leisure and tourism, physiotherapy, and coaching are just some of the careers our students can and have gone onto.

BTEC Level 2 Sport

BTEC Double Grade   GCSE Equivalent
Pass – Pass         C – C
Merit – Merit       B – B
Distinction – Distinction     A – A
Distinction*- Distinction*    A* – A*

The course

This course covers the following units:
• Unit 1 Fitness for sport and exercise
• Unit 2 Practical sports performance
• Unit 4 The sports performer in action
• Unit 5 Training for personal fitness

How are students assessed?

Unit 1 Fitness for sport and exercise
Type of external assessment The unit is externally assessed using an onscreen test – Pearson sets and marks the test.
The assessment must be taken by the learner under examination conditions.
Length of assessment The external assessment will be 1 hour.
No. of marks 50
Assessment availability On demand
Unit 2, 4 and 5 are all internally assessed in the form of coursework. Each unit has 3 assignments in it and each one can be submitted as a first submission and a resubmission if it fails the first attempt.

Unit 1 Learning aims:
A know about the components of fitness and the principles of training
B explore different fitness training methods
C investigate fitness testing to determine fitness levels.


Unit 2 Learning aims:
A understand the rules, regulations and scoring systems for selected sports
B practically demonstrate skills, techniques and tactics in selected sports
C be able to review sports performance.

Unit 4 Learning aims:
A know about the short-term responses and long-term adaptations of the body systems to exercise.
B know about the different energy systems used during sports performance.


Unit 5 Learning aims:
A design a personal fitness training programme
B know about exercise adherence factors and strategies for continued training success
C implement a self-designed personal fitness training programme to achieve own goals and objectives
D review a personal fitness training programme.

What can students go on to do after this course?

Students can progress onto A Level PE in The Consortium or BTEC Level 3 at Cottingham High School Sixth Form. They can also pursue careers in sports development, leisure and tourism, physiotherapy and coaching.